formfollowsfunctionjournal:

3 Shakes at a time!
Hamilton Beach
Seen.

formfollowsfunctionjournal:

3 Shakes at a time!

Hamilton Beach

Seen.

karamazove:

Heroes of the Blues by Robert Crumb

karamazove:

Heroes of the Blues by Robert Crumb

nevver:

Calvin and Hobbes
nevver:

Calvin and Hobbes

pgdigs:

Circa 1889: Nellie Bly, investigative reporter

Relentless. Curious. Direct. Nellie Bly’s character was fitting for a woman who introduced to America the idea of a female reporter. Bly’s life story reads like a novel; at times it’s so good it’s difficult to believe.

Born Elizabeth Cochran in May 1867 in Cochran Mills, Armstrong County, Bly crammed a lot into her short life: She wrote for a Pittsburgh newspaper, became one of the nation’s first female investigative reporters, wrote for Joseph Pulitzer’s New York World and traveled around the world in record time.

Nellie Bly started as a reporter at the Daily Pittsburgh Dispatch. She was 18 at the time and supporting her mother and two brothers in Pittsburgh. After reading a Dispatch article suggesting women should stay at home and confine themselves to housework, Bly wrote a fiery rebuttal and sent it to the paper. Dispatch managing editor George A. Madden was impressed. He hired the writer and gave her the pen name “Nelly Bly,” from a popular Stephen Foster song. A typesetter misspelled the name and  ’Nellie Bly’ was born.

Frustrated by being assigned to write about fashion and flower shows, Bly moved to New York in 1887 and landed a job at the the New York World. She quickly made a name for herself by pretending to be an insane beggar and being admitted to New York’s Hospital for the Insane. She spent 10 days there, then wrote a story detailing barbaric conditions and care at the facility. Her work triggered the state of New York to spend an additional $1 million for the care of the mentally ill.

Bly’s most famous accomplishment came in 1889. Here’s how Bly told the story to The Pittsburgh Press:

"My editor said, ‘Have you any ideas today?’ ‘One,’ I answered slowly, fearing he would laugh at me. ‘I want to go around the world in 80 days or less!’ I was informed that if there was such a trip I would be the one to go. One stormy evening I was called into the office. ‘Can you start around the world day after tomorrow?’ I was asked. ‘I can start this moment if necessary,’ I answered.”

And so the journey began. Nellie Bly wore a heavy dress “which would stand constant wear for three months” and packed a light gown for the tropics — only those two dresses plus a small bag, no umbrella. She boarded the Augusta Victoria on Nov. 14, 1889. After 72 days, six hours and 11 minutes, Bly returned by train to a cheering crowd of 10,000 in Jersey City.

Nellie Bly left journalism when she was 28 and married wealthy industrialist Robert L. Seaman, who was 72. After Seaman’s death in 1904, Bly ran his estate and unsuccessfully managed his business. Lonely and nearly broke, Bly returned to journalism. Arthur Brisbane gave her a job at the New York Journal and she was at it again — this time on behalf of neglected children, making a difference one story at a time.

While on one of her reporting assignments, Bly caught a cold and died of pneumonia on Jan. 27, 1922. She was 57.

 — Mila Sanina  

Aka whole lotta houndstooth

strawberriesandsummertime:

I feel like this is one of those quotes that everyone obsesses over, but really has pretty much no meaning.

strawberriesandsummertime:

I feel like this is one of those quotes that everyone obsesses over, but really has pretty much no meaning.

(Source: t-cookie)

atlanticinfocus:

From 2013: The Year in Photos, September - December, one of 40 photos in this essay, part 3 of a 3-part summary of 2013. Miles Scott, dressed as Batkid, walks with Batman before saving a damsel in distress in San Francisco, on November 15, 2013. San Francisco turned into Gotham City on that day, as city officials helped fulfill Scott’s wish to be “Batkid.” Scott, a leukemia patient from Tulelake in Northern California, was called into service on Friday morning by San Francisco Police Chief Greg Suhr to help fight crime, The Greater Bay Area Make-A-Wish Foundation said. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

atlanticinfocus:

From 2013: The Year in Photos, September - December, one of 40 photos in this essay, part 3 of a 3-part summary of 2013. Miles Scott, dressed as Batkid, walks with Batman before saving a damsel in distress in San Francisco, on November 15, 2013. San Francisco turned into Gotham City on that day, as city officials helped fulfill Scott’s wish to be “Batkid.” Scott, a leukemia patient from Tulelake in Northern California, was called into service on Friday morning by San Francisco Police Chief Greg Suhr to help fight crime, The Greater Bay Area Make-A-Wish Foundation said. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

atlanticinfocus:

From 2013: The Year in Photos, May - August, one of 40 photos in this essay, part 2 of a 3-part summary of 2013. In a natural color mosaic, Saturn eclipses the Sun as seen by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft on July 19, 2013. This image spans about 404,880 miles (651,591 km) across. Earth is barely visible as a single pixel just below the main rings, and to the right of the planet. At this point, Cassini was looking back from more than 898 million miles (1.5 billion km) away from Earth. (AP Photo/NASA/JPL-Caltech/SSI)

atlanticinfocus:

From 2013: The Year in Photos, May - August, one of 40 photos in this essay, part 2 of a 3-part summary of 2013. In a natural color mosaic, Saturn eclipses the Sun as seen by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft on July 19, 2013. This image spans about 404,880 miles (651,591 km) across. Earth is barely visible as a single pixel just below the main rings, and to the right of the planet. At this point, Cassini was looking back from more than 898 million miles (1.5 billion km) away from Earth. (AP Photo/NASA/JPL-Caltech/SSI)

atlanticinfocus:

From 2013: The Year in Photos, January - April, one of 40 photos in this essay, part 1 of a 3-part photo summary of 2013. Here, a truck is covered in ice as firefighters work to extinguish a massive blaze at a vacant warehouse in Chicago, Illinois, on January 23, 2013. More than 200 firefighters battled the five-alarm fire as temperatures were in the single digits. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

atlanticinfocus:

From 2013: The Year in Photos, January - April, one of 40 photos in this essay, part 1 of a 3-part photo summary of 2013. Here, a truck is covered in ice as firefighters work to extinguish a massive blaze at a vacant warehouse in Chicago, Illinois, on January 23, 2013. More than 200 firefighters battled the five-alarm fire as temperatures were in the single digits. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

theatlantic:

The Most Powerful Images of 2013

The Atlantic's Alan Taylor sifts through thousands of photographs to assemble his breathtaking In Focus galleries, covering everything from the conflict in Syria to volcanic activity around the globe. For the video above, we collected more than 80 photographs from the past year to create a three-minute montage set to a track by Broke for Free. The result is a visceral, graphic look at the tragedies and triumphs of 2013 and a tribute to the photojournalists who documented everything along the way.

Read more.

thehonorablejudgewhitey:

St Louis parking garage, 1953

thehonorablejudgewhitey:

St Louis parking garage, 1953


Thanksgiving Parade
erwitt 1988

Thanksgiving Parade

erwitt 1988

denisebefore:

Thanksgiving Parade
erwitt 1988

denisebefore:

Thanksgiving Parade

erwitt 1988

denisebefore:

Niagara Falls
NYSarchives c.1901

denisebefore:

Niagara Falls

NYSarchives c.1901